Support Money – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 18:30:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-150x150.png Support Money – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ 32 32 Senator Kyrsten Sinema officially censored by the Arizona Democratic Party https://www.smlxtralarge.com/senator-kyrsten-sinema-officially-censored-by-the-arizona-democratic-party/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 17:03:45 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/senator-kyrsten-sinema-officially-censored-by-the-arizona-democratic-party/ The Arizona Democratic Party’s executive committee formally censured Senator Kyrsten Sinema on Saturday morning over her inaction on changing filibuster rules to pass voting rights reform. “…on the issue of filibuster and the urgency of protecting the right to vote, we have been crystal clear. In the choice between an archaic legislative standard and protecting […]]]>

The Arizona Democratic Party’s executive committee formally censured Senator Kyrsten Sinema on Saturday morning over her inaction on changing filibuster rules to pass voting rights reform.

“…on the issue of filibuster and the urgency of protecting the right to vote, we have been crystal clear. In the choice between an archaic legislative standard and protecting Arizonans’ right to vote, we choose the latter, and we always will,” President Raquel Teran said in a statement.

“While we take no pleasure in this announcement, the ADP Board of Directors has decided to formally censure Senator Sinema due to her failure to do all that is necessary to ensure the health of our democracy. “

Sinema is facing renewed heat from those who helped her elect her after she and Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia this week were the only two Democrats to vote against state reform. filibuster, thereby derailing the passage of suffrage legislation.

The narrow Democratic majority in the Senate meant filibuster reform was seen as crucial to passing the John R. Lewis Freedom to Vote Act – a top priority for Democrats and President Joe Biden.

Arizona Democrats organized strongly to elect Sinema to the Senate – she once served in the US House – earning her a narrow victory. They lobbied Sinema for months to change his stance on the filibuster, but many couldn’t get a meeting with the senator.

With his refusal to change the filibuster rule – on the Republican side – and voting rights dead for now in the Senate, Arizona Democrats are raising money to back Sinema’s 2024 main challenger. Influential independent Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders said this week that he would support a challenge to Sinema.

Over the summer, the Arizona Democratic Party promised to give Sinema a vote of “no confidence” if she did not change her position to pave the way for voting reform. They blamed her Saturday morning.

“This shouldn’t be a partisan issue — the duty to protect our most basic right to vote is one we all share,” Arizona Democratic Party Chairperson Raquel Teran said in a statement. “We counted on Senator Sinema to fight for Arizona, find a way forward and protect our democracy, but on this issue she has failed. Right now Arizona is ground zero. for the modern struggle for the right to vote, and we have no time to waste.”

The Grand Canyon state is a hot spot for Republican-led changes to the vote. After the 2020 election, the state Senate ordered a partisan review of millions of state ballots, which took place while the Republican-controlled state legislature focused on restrictive ballot bills. Republicans have all but eliminated the state’s permanent early voting list, which means ballots are no longer automatically sent to voters who haven’t used the system. The bills were the cornerstone of GOP lawmaking in 2021, and the 2022 session continues to focus on electoral reform.

Activists and voters domestically point to those Republican-led efforts as the backdrop to Sinema’s refusal to budge.

Sinema lost a major endorsement this week from Emily’s List, a major political organization that funds campaigns it endorses, including those supporting abortion rights.

A coalition of groups — made up of state Democrats — wrote to the group asking for action on the issue. Prior to the vote, Emily’s List announced that they would no longer support Sinema unless they changed their position.

“If Senator Sinema cannot support a path forward for the passage of this legislation, we believe she is undermining the foundations of our democracy, her own path to victory and also the mission of EMILY’s List, and we will not be able to approve her move forward,” Emily’s List President Laphonza Butler said in a statement.

These same activists have written to other major political donor groups, including the Human Rights Campaign, which focuses on LGBTQ+ issues.

Groups looking to fund a main challenger have raised at least $455,000. Two groups have yet to choose a candidate, but other Democrats are pressing Rep. Ruben Gallego to challenge Sinema. A political action committee, dubbed “Run Ruben Run”, will funnel money in his direction if he chooses to participate in the race.

Gallego hasn’t ruled out a run for Sinema’s seat, and he tweeted a veiled warning after Senate votes failed this week.

“I’m disappointed in the Senate’s failure to advance the John Lewis Suffrage Act. But I’m not giving up and neither should you. Let’s work hard to elect good Democrats who support suffrage. and defeat those who don’t – in 22 years and beyond,” Gallego tweeted.

The congressman also told CNN his phone rang with demands that he intervene against Sinema, saying there was “a lot of frustration about a lot of things that happened in the past with the Senator Sinema, and that kind of was the breaking point.”

Democrats swear the fight to consolidate voting rights in the country is not over, but that fight will now continue for some with a focus on replacing Sinema.

“Millions of Democrats and pro-democracy independents are furious with Sinema,” a fundraising group wrote in a message after Wednesday’s vote. “Give them a chance to do something with this anger that can help turn the tide. This fight is not over. But together we will ensure that Kyrsten Sinema’s career as the chosen one ends this evening.”

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Ringgit Opens Slightly Lower on Continued US Dollar Support | Money https://www.smlxtralarge.com/ringgit-opens-slightly-lower-on-continued-us-dollar-support-money/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 01:50:01 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/ringgit-opens-slightly-lower-on-continued-us-dollar-support-money/ At 9:01 am, the local rating fell to 4.1910/1935 against the greenback from 4.1925/1950 at yesterday’s close. —Photo Reuters KUALA LUMPUR, Jan. 21 – The ringgit opened slightly lower against the US dollar on Friday as mixed signals from the stock market continue to support the greenback, an analyst said. At 9:01 am, the local […]]]>

At 9:01 am, the local rating fell to 4.1910/1935 against the greenback from 4.1925/1950 at yesterday’s close. —Photo Reuters

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan. 21 – The ringgit opened slightly lower against the US dollar on Friday as mixed signals from the stock market continue to support the greenback, an analyst said.

At 9:01 am, the local rating fell to 4.1910/1935 against the greenback from 4.1925/1950 at yesterday’s close.

Speaking to Bernama, Bank Islam Malaysia Bhd’s chief economist, Mohd Afzanizam Abdul Rashid, said the sell-off in US stocks suggests market participants have become increasingly wary of the prospect of a rise in interest rates.

The yield on 10-year US Treasuries also fell to 1.78%, indicating that investors may have turned to risk-free assets to hedge against marker volatility.

He said such a risk aversion mode was clearly benefiting the US Dollar, with the US Dollar Index (DXY) hitting 95.735 points.

“Following this, the ringgit/US dollar is likely to rely on a weaker trajectory today.

“The Monetary Policy Committee of Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) kept the overnight rate (OPR) unchanged at 1.75%, indicating that the BNM is in no rush to increase the OPR. and implies that the ringgit could remain weak for the time being,” he said. .

Overall, the local note traded mostly higher against a basket of other major currencies.

The ringgit ended higher against the euro at 4.7371/7405 from 4.7521/7555 at Thursday’s close and rose against the Singapore dollar at 3.1097/1124 from 3.1103/1130.

The local note rose against the British pound to 5.6931/6971 from 5.7066/7107 yesterday but fell against the Japanese yen to 3.6831/6861 from 3.6640/6670. — Bernama

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Political consultants pocket taxpayers’ money https://www.smlxtralarge.com/political-consultants-pocket-taxpayers-money/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 01:37:32 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/political-consultants-pocket-taxpayers-money/ Members of Congress are turning to the same political consultants who got them elected to blast taxpayer-funded communications from their government offices, records show. Why is this important: Although these members are not allowed to enter politics with official funds, the companies have expertise in enhancing the image of elected officials for political purposes and […]]]>

Members of Congress are turning to the same political consultants who got them elected to blast taxpayer-funded communications from their government offices, records show.

Why is this important: Although these members are not allowed to enter politics with official funds, the companies have expertise in enhancing the image of elected officials for political purposes and are in high demand for campaigning and government work.

By the numbers: Since 2016, at least 251 current and former members of the House have used their congressional office budgets to pay vendors who have also worked for their campaigns, according to an Axios analysis of congressional disbursements and campaign finance records.

  • Some consultancies even tripled: they worked for members’ official offices, their campaigns, and the independent political spenders — including PACs — who worked to get those members elected.
  • Together, the more than 100 companies operating on both sides of the official/political divide removed nearly $39 million in public funds from the congressional offices of members they helped elect, records show.
  • An Axios analysis found that payments fluctuated with election cycles: $6.2 million in 2016, $4.1 million in 2017, $9.4 million in 2018, $5.7 million in 2019, $9.9 million in 2020 and only $3.3 million in the first three quarters of 2021.

The big picture: House rules require that “stamped” communications — advertisements, direct mail and other mass communications paid for with official funds — be strictly non-political. This means they cannot influence voters to support or oppose a candidate.

  • MPs nonetheless use them to tout the legislative achievements and policy positions to the very voters they need every two years.
  • Many members have used prepaid mail to convey important information to voters, such as district availabilities and notices of federal benefits and services.
  • Others have used it to plug in more explicitly partisan efforts, like the recent postage stamped mailers calling for the impeachment of President Biden.

There are clear leaders among the list of sellers who divide the official-political divide.

  • The top companies on the Republican side are Arena and Axiom Strategies, which, though sister companies focused on outspoken communications, have each worked with more than 40 House members whose campaigns have also paid them for political services.
  • Both were also paid by independent super PACs to help elect House members with whom they worked in a political and official capacity.
  • On the Democratic side, direct mail provider Mission Control worked with 25 campaigns for House members who also paid the company’s official arm, Mail Matters.
  • Mission Control was the listed vendor for independent spend supporting eight of those customers or attacking their adversaries.

Axios contacted these companies for comment.

  • They refused or did not respond to inquiries.

What they say : Andrew Mayersohn, a researcher at OpenSecrets, says the overlap isn’t entirely surprising.

  • The universe of campaign vendors is very small, especially considering how many companies work exclusively with Democrats or Republicans,” Mayersohn said. “So you would expect to see a lot of shared vendors. ‘one way or another.”

Be smart: Messaging and communications are hallmarks of Congress in the era of the famous legislator.

  • Although not explicitly political, official communications expenditures nevertheless serve a politically complementary purpose by enhancing a member’s public image.
  • Relying on the same vendors behind their political operations provides continuity between donor-funded messaging and taxpayer dollars.
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House of Horrors survivor Jordan Turpin’s heartfelt message to donors who support her siblings https://www.smlxtralarge.com/house-of-horrors-survivor-jordan-turpins-heartfelt-message-to-donors-who-support-her-siblings/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 08:19:30 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/house-of-horrors-survivor-jordan-turpins-heartfelt-message-to-donors-who-support-her-siblings/ by Jordan Turpin ICT Tac account may house, at first glance, a cacophony of dance-filled videos that don’t seem too different from the rest flooding the video-sharing app – but the truth behind it and what the videos are working towards is more sinister than typical. . “Hey guys, just wanted to drop by here […]]]>

by Jordan Turpin ICT Tac account may house, at first glance, a cacophony of dance-filled videos that don’t seem too different from the rest flooding the video-sharing app – but the truth behind it and what the videos are working towards is more sinister than typical. .

“Hey guys, just wanted to drop by here real quick and say thank you so much for all the love and support,” Turpin, who was verified on TikTok this week, said in a recent video. Look above.

“Anyone who followed me or watched my videos, I appreciate you so much and I love you so much.”

READ MORE: “I’m pregnant, but my partner doesn’t love me”

Jordan Turpin thanked his fans this week for their support after being verified by TikTok. (ICT Tac)

The 21 year old is one of 13 children who escaped the so-called house of horrors – where their parents David and Louise Turpin kept them locked up in misery, starving, and for some children, chained to beds.

In 2018, Turpin, who was 17 at the time, escaped from the California home after calling authorities. His parents were later sentenced to life in prison.

“I was telling them everything. We’re not going to school. We’re living in filth. We’re starving. And everything else,” Turpin said of the 911 call to Diane Sawyer in November.

READ MORE: Kyle Sandilands announces engagement to Tegan Kynaston

On TikTok, Turpin uses her platform to stand up for her siblings — some of whom she says are still struggling — and accepts donations through Venmo and Cash App.

“People ask me if I see my siblings often, how are my siblings doing,” Turpin said on TikTok.

“I want you to know, I see my siblings very often and I love them so much. We’re not in the best life situation right now, but we have a roof over our heads and we have a way to get food and we are all very grateful for that.”

READ MORE: The most shocking royal family scandals

The Turpin children
The Turpin children were aged 2 to 29 when they were rescued. (Facebook)

Turpin also thanked those who donated to her, the money she says she gave to her siblings, who were between the ages of 2 and 29 when they were rescued.

“Now I can afford to give all my siblings some really great gifts this year and I’m so happy and grateful to be able to do that,” she said.

“I hope one day I can help you and others just as you have helped me. It means so much to me.”

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If you or someone you know needs help, contact 1800RESPECT at 1800 732 732 or safety rope on 13 11 14. In an emergency, dial Triple Zero (000).

Girl writing in her diary

5 women share their journal entries

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Live updates from the fourth stimulus check: $200 Social Security, child tax credit, tax filing, Golden State payment… https://www.smlxtralarge.com/live-updates-from-the-fourth-stimulus-check-200-social-security-child-tax-credit-tax-filing-golden-state-payment/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 18:42:38 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/live-updates-from-the-fourth-stimulus-check-200-social-security-child-tax-credit-tax-filing-golden-state-payment/ Securities: – A tax return arrears of more than 6 million could create delays for receive tax refunds this year. – IRS publishes plans to counter the impact of high inflationduring tax time – Some older people will see social security benefitincreased to $1,657 – 2022 BREAKpayment schedule published – Changes to the retirement agecould […]]]>

Securities:

– A tax return arrears of more than 6 million could create delays for receive tax refunds this year.

– IRS publishes plans to counter the impact of high inflationduring tax time

– Some older people will see social security benefitincreased to $1,657

– 2022 BREAKpayment schedule published

– Changes to the retirement agecould have an impact on your social security benefits in 2022

– Consumer price index increases 0.5% in December, 7 percent in the last twelve months

– Will you receive a fourth stimulus check of your state in 2022?

– Golden State’s latest round of stimulus checks have now been distributed

Useful information and links:

Tax Season 2021

– When can i expect my W-2 from my employer?

– An overview benefits available to parents and guardiansthis tax season

– When can you file your tax return?

Child tax credit

– How? ‘Or’ What many can expect families to claim for the child tax credit when they file their taxes?

– No child tax credit payments to be sent in January after Senate fails to pass Build Back Better bill

— Senator Manchin has his say on President Biden’s future Building back better proposals.

Stimulus checks

– How many stimulus checks have been approved in the last 12 months?

Social Security

Social Security beneficiaries are in line for a COLA increase, but could they also get a additional $200this month?

– What does the 5.9% increase in COLA does it mean for Social Security recipients?

Last articles :

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Supreme Court blocks Biden’s vaccine mandate for big employers https://www.smlxtralarge.com/supreme-court-blocks-bidens-vaccine-mandate-for-big-employers/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 01:55:45 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/supreme-court-blocks-bidens-vaccine-mandate-for-big-employers/ WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court on Thursday blocked the Biden administration to enforce a vaccine or testing mandate for large employers, dealing a blow to a key part of the White House’s plan to fight the pandemic as coronavirus cases resulting from the Omicron variant are on the rise. But in a modest victory by […]]]>

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court on Thursday blocked the Biden administration to enforce a vaccine or testing mandate for large employers, dealing a blow to a key part of the White House’s plan to fight the pandemic as coronavirus cases resulting from the Omicron variant are on the rise.

But in a modest victory by President Biden, the court authorized a more limited mandate requiring health care workers in facilities receiving federal funds to be vaccinated.

The vote in the employer mandate case was 6 to 3, with the Liberal justices dissenting. The vote in the health care case was 5-4, with Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh joining the liberal justices to form a majority.

The employer’s decision undermined one of President Biden’s most significant attempts to tame the virus and left the country with a patchwork of state laws and policies, largely leaving businesses and businesses alone .

The president welcomed the decision in his favor, saying in a statement that it would save the lives of healthcare workers and patients. But he said he was disappointed the court overturned the employer’s warrant, which he said was “based on science and law”.

In the employers’ and health workers’ cases, the justices sought to find out whether Congress had authorized the executive branch to take sweeping measures to deal with the health care crisis.

The unsigned majority opinion in the employer case said a workplace risk law did not justify a mandate that would have required more than 80 million workers to be vaccinated against the coronavirus or to wear masks and to be tested weekly. He also pointed to the novelty and scope of the warrant issued by the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, claiming that Congress had failed to authorize the agency to act and outlining its response as “a brutal instrument”.

The mandate “makes no distinction based on industry or risk of exposure to Covid-19,” the majority opinion said, adding that it was “a significant encroachment on life – and the health – of a large number of employees”.

But the opinion said more suitable regulations could be legal given that “most lifeguards and linemen face the same regulations as doctors and meatpackers”.

In a dissenting opinion, Justices Stephen G. Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan expressed disbelief at the court’s willingness to thwart “the federal government’s ability to counter the unprecedented threat that Covid-19 poses to workers in our country”.

Regulating workplace safety, the three dissenting justices wrote, is precisely what OSHA is commanded to do.

They agreed that the key issue in the case was that of institutional competence to deal with the health care crisis.

“Underlying everything else in this conflict,” they wrote, “is one simple question: Who decides how much and what kind of protection American workers need from Covid-19? An agency with occupational health and safety expertise, acting as Congress and the authorized president? Or a court, devoid of any knowledge of how to protect workplaces and insulated from liability for any harm it causes?

The wisest course, they wrote, would have been to rely on OSHA.

“In the face of a pandemic that is still raging, this court tells the agency responsible for protecting worker safety that it may not do so in all necessary workplaces,” the dissidents wrote of the majority actions in the case, National Federation of Independent Business v. Department of Labor, No. 21A244. “As sickness and death continue to mount, this court tells the agency it cannot respond in the most effective way possible.”

OSHA issued the mandate in November, providing exceptions for workers with religious objections and those who do not come into close contact with other people in the course of their work. The administration considered that this would allow 22 million people to be vaccinated and avoid 250,000 hospitalizations.

The decision means businesses across the country must now choose between protecting employees, potentially losing reluctant to comply staff members and breaching disparate regulations.

Several major companies, like United Airlines and Tyson Foods, already have warrants, while others had held back and waited for legal battles to be resolved. Some companies fear losing employees at a time when workers are already scarce. Although companies with mandates said those concerns largely did not materialize, a national requirement could have helped ease those concerns.

Walmart, Amazon and JPMorgan Chase, three of the largest employers in the United States, have not yet issued general requirements for their workers. Some companies that have waited have raised concerns about the costs of setting up testing programs and turning away unvaccinated employees.

This second mandate applies to workers in hospitals and other health care facilities that participate in the Medicare and Medicaid programs.

Federal judges in Missouri and Louisiana had blocked the requirement, which provides exemptions for people with medical or religious objections, in rulings that applied in about half of the states. It will now come into effect nationwide.

In an unsigned opinion in Biden v. Missouri, No. 21A240, the majority wrote that the health care mandate issued by the Secretary of Health and Human Services “falls within the powers given to him by Congress.”

Current law gives the secretary general authority to make regulations to ensure the “effective administration” of the Medicare and Medicaid programs, and portions of the law relating to various types of facilities generally also authorize the secretary to impose requirements to protect health and safety. of sick.

The majority wrote that the mandate “fits perfectly into the language of the law.”

The Majority added that facilities that receive money from the Medicare and Medicaid programs must comply with numerous federal health and safety requirements.

“All of this is perhaps why healthcare workers and public health organizations overwhelmingly support the Secretary’s Rule,” the majority wrote. “Indeed, their support suggests that a vaccination requirement under these circumstances is a straightforward and predictable example of the ‘health and safety’ regulations Congress has authorized the Secretary to impose.”

In dissent, Justice Clarence Thomas, joined by Justices Samuel A. Alito Jr., Neil M. Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett, wrote that “scattered provisions” in the law did not justify the warrant.

Without “extremely clear” congressional authorization, Judge Thomas wrote, the federal government should not be allowed to force health care workers “to choose between losing their livelihoods and acquiescing to a vaccine they have rejected for so long. months”.

“These cases are not about the effectiveness or importance of Covid-19 vaccines,” he wrote. “It’s only about whether ‘the agency’ has the legal power to force healthcare workers, by coercing their employers, into having a medical procedure they don’t want and can’t undo.”

The Supreme Court has repeatedly upheld state vaccine mandates in various contexts against constitutional challenges. The two cases decided on Thursday dealt with a different issue, that of whether Congress authorized the executive branch to institute the requirements.

The majority opinion in the healthcare workers case appeared to attempt to harmonize the two judgments.

“The challenges posed by a global pandemic do not permit a federal agency to exercise power not conferred on it by Congress,” the opinion said. “At the same time, such unprecedented circumstances provide no reason to limit the exercise of the powers the agency has long been recognized for.”

Emma Goldberg and Lauren Hirsch contributed report.

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Crime, COVID Aid, and Cost of Living: What Colorado Lawmakers Will Focus On In 2022 Legislative Session https://www.smlxtralarge.com/crime-covid-aid-and-cost-of-living-what-colorado-lawmakers-will-focus-on-in-2022-legislative-session/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 01:47:44 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/crime-covid-aid-and-cost-of-living-what-colorado-lawmakers-will-focus-on-in-2022-legislative-session/ It also marks the third year that lawmakers have had to do their job in the face of the challenges of the pandemic. Some of the COVID security protocols instituted on Capitol Hill last year will still be in place. Masks are mandatory in committee rooms and for staff and media on chamber floors, but […]]]>

It also marks the third year that lawmakers have had to do their job in the face of the challenges of the pandemic.

Some of the COVID security protocols instituted on Capitol Hill last year will still be in place. Masks are mandatory in committee rooms and for staff and media on chamber floors, but not mandatory for lawmakers. If desired, lawmakers and staff will receive two COVID tests per week.

Lawmakers will also be able to work remotely as needed.

“We have full confidence in members of the legislature to be responsible role models, to take the necessary precautions to protect themselves, to protect their constituents (and) those who work here on Capitol Hill,” Polis said.


Four things to watch out for this session

Lawmakers have a lot of money to spend (and a few caveats)

The pandemic has been a three-year roller coaster for Colorado’s budget. When it first struck, lawmakers struggled to make extreme cuts as a little understood virus shut down huge parts of the economy.

“This first budget process (in 2020) was in crisis mode, and we were very focused on protection. We were in a defensive position, ”said State Representative Julie McCluskie, the new democratic chairman of the joint budget committee.

Almost two years later, the situation is quite different.

The state has approximately $ 3.6 billion in federal COVID relief money to spend this year. But these funds come with reservations. Federal money is primarily “one-time” – so if lawmakers use it to launch ongoing programs, those can quickly become the responsibility of Colorado taxpayers. Instead, lawmakers say they hope to devote the bulk of the funding to launching “transformative change” in a few areas.

Hart Van Denburg / CPR News
Democratic State Representatives Leslie Herod, left, and Julie McCluskie upstairs in the House on Thursday, March 4, 2021.

The state also collects significantly more money from its usual sources, such as property taxes and income taxes, due to economic conditions. That’s about $ 3.2 billion in “new” money in the state’s regular budget that lawmakers could spend. The governor offered his own ideas on how to spend that money, including increased funding for education and new public safety programs, as well as setting aside as insurance against future downturns.

But there are caveats: Factors like inflation will consume some of the state’s money, and the Taxpayer Bill of Rights will likely limit income over the next few years while sending billions back to the pockets of the government. Coloradans.

“It’s a bit of a dance, the budgeting process – as you learn more and understand the income and expense equation, you also need to understand the needs and priorities,” he said. McCluskie said.

For now, Democratic leaders are asking their members to monitor the results.

“If you have a new idea, can we implement it in a way that is already part of the program that we have instead of developing a whole new program? »Declared the leader of the majority in the House Daneya Esgar.

210830-DENNYS-CORTEZ-EMPLOI-EMPLOIHart Van Denburg / CPR News
A billboard advertising job openings at local Denny’s in Cortez on Monday, August 30, 2021.

What will happen to the state economy and people’s wallets?

Meanwhile, the economy is recovering unpredictably. Employees earn higher wages and better jobs. Companies are struggling to hire for low-paying positions. Inflation affects everyone and is likely to be accelerate federal actions it could flow as far as Colorado.

To help, Democrats say they plan to cut some fees and taxes for businesses. Perhaps the most important measure would collectively save businesses hundreds of millions of dollars in impending unemployment taxes. Employers face a sharp increase in their UI premiums due to the pandemic, but Polis proposed using roughly $ 600 million in state and federal money to reduce the impact.

Democrats are also talking about delaying fees for workers and employers who would pay Colorado’s new paid family leave program.

From 2023, the state is expected to start collecting around 1% of employee paychecks. Polis proposed that the state cut the new fee by a tenth in the first six months and top it up with state money.

STATE-REP-GARNETT-DEMOCRATES-LEGISLATUREHart Van Denburg / CPR News
Speaker of the House Alec Garnett.

Other fees Democrats are targeting include driver’s licenses and professional licenses for teachers, healthcare workers and others.

“Our work will ensure that if you work hard and do your fair share, you get a fair view of the American Dream and the incredible Colorado way of life,” said the Speaker of the House. Alec garnett.

Republicans, however, have pounced on this agenda, accusing Democrats of creating many of the new costs they now want to save people from. (While many Democratic lawmakers have spent years trying to push through a paid family leave program, it was ultimately approved by voters.)

“We found out that all of these other fees and things that were piled up on Colorado families were mistakes, but I didn’t hear that two years ago,” said McKean, minority parliamentary leader. told reporters after seeing Democrats unveil their platform on Monday. “Two years ago, I heard that this is how the government was going to help you. And now we find out, long after the fact, that we really need to pull this stuff off. “

rmDavid Zalubowski / AP
Warning tape blocks the intersection of 22nd and Champa as officers from the Denver Police Department help with a homeless sweep on Tuesday, August 25, 2020, north of downtown Denver.

Rise in crime sparks debate over appropriate response

In recent years, Democrats have focused on reforming the criminal justice system in an effort to keep people out of the justice system. But with rising crime rate, Polis and other Democratic leaders say they want to work on crime prevention, through policies that keep people out of trouble and more funding for local departments to hire, retrain and retain law enforcement officers. order.

“We need to consider investing in good policing and public safety measures. I know that it is not only a priority of the governor, it is a priority of the General Assembly and it is a priority of our members and it is a priority for the communities ”, declared the president of the Senate. . Leroy garcia.

Republicans also say they are hearing many concerns from people who do not feel safe in their own neighborhood or in places like downtown Denver, and that if officer training is part of it. the solution, the state must also toughen the application of the law.

Republican State Senator Paul Lundeen said they heard of people calling to report a theft or other property crime and being told that police did not have the resources to deal with it.

COLEG-SPECIAL-SESSION-COVID-201201Hart Van Denburg / CPR News
State Senator Paul Lundeen on the Senate Finance Committee gestures during a hearing on Tuesday, December 1, 2020.

“It is a tragedy and people need to feel safe in their community,” he said.

While Polis has said he sees a great opportunity for bipartisan collaboration on public safety this session, some other Democrats fear losing momentum in their reform efforts of recent years.

“My community is concerned that we are being targeted and blamed for the rise in crime,” said State Representative Jennifer Bacon, member of the Black Democratic Legislative Caucus. “So I think for me personally I can’t just be a progressive when it’s easy and I can’t just wait for the pendulum to swing so far that it will take another tragedy to get this job done. ”

Bacon plans to work on legislation that would prevent people from being jailed for low-level crimes, and ways to further erase some criminal records to give people a better chance to enter the workforce and reduce the burden. recidivism after conviction.

210304-LEGISLATURE-SENATE-PETTERSENHart Van Denburg / CPR News
Democratic State Senator Brittany Pettersen chairs the Senate Finance Committee at the State Capitol on Monday, March 8, 2021.

Lots of money for behavioral health, but is it enough?

Behavioral health is another area where lawmakers see an opportunity to use federal COVID dollars to make big changes.

Democratic State Senator Brittany Pettersen chaired the Behavioral Health Working Group who worked during the legislative offseason to develop a list of proposals spend $ 450 million in one-off funds.

“I couldn’t be more excited that we had the committee’s unanimous support for these policies,” Pettersen said.

Among their goals are better coordination between mental and physical health care providers and better monitoring of people in crisis to ensure they get the help they need, instead of just cycling through hospitals. .

Democratic State representing Judy Amabile actively worked on ideas to improve how the state approaches mental health issues throughout his first term. Her adult son has schizophrenia and the challenges his family faces were part of what led her to run for office.

“$ 450 million sounds like a lot of money, but when you really start digging for what’s needed, it’s not a lot,” Amabile said. “But we can still make significant improvements to the system with this money. It won’t solve everything, but it will make a difference in the lives of many people. So I am optimistic that we will accomplish this.

COLORADO-LEGISLATURE-OPENING-DAY-ROTUNDAHart Van Denburg / CPR News
Climb the stairs to the rotunda at the Capitol in Denver as the Colorado General Assembly opened its 2021 session on Wednesday, January 13.

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Relating to adopt baby of Florida MPs who died by suicide https://www.smlxtralarge.com/relating-to-adopt-baby-of-florida-mps-who-died-by-suicide/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 14:10:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/relating-to-adopt-baby-of-florida-mps-who-died-by-suicide/ The infant son of two Florida police officers who died by suicide will be adopted by a close relative, according to a fundraising page to support the child. Clayton Osteen and Victoria Pacheco of the St. Lucie County Sheriff’s Office both died by suicide this week, according to the sheriff’s office, leaving behind their one-month-old […]]]>

The infant son of two Florida police officers who died by suicide will be adopted by a close relative, according to a fundraising page to support the child.

Clayton Osteen and Victoria Pacheco of the St. Lucie County Sheriff’s Office both died by suicide this week, according to the sheriff’s office, leaving behind their one-month-old son Jayce Osteen.

Kelly Ridle, a friend of Osteen who set up a GoFundMe page to raise money for Jayce’s future, announced that the baby will be adopted by a “close family member.”

“The families of Clayton and Victoria are very grateful for all the prayers and support received,” Ridle wrote on the donations page. “All donations will be used to enrich Jayce’s life experiences and secure a better future.”

Clayton Osteen and Victoria Pacheco of the St. Lucie County Sheriff’s Office both committed suicide this week, leaving behind their one-month-old son, Jayce Osteen.GoFundMe

A representative from GoFundMe has confirmed the validity of the fundraising campaign, which raised over $ 60,000, to TODAY.

Sheriff Ken J. Mascara announced in a Facebook post on Tuesday that Osteen, 24, attempted suicide on New Years Eve. He was taken off life support on Sunday. Pacheco, 23, committed suicide a few days later.

“Words cannot express the tremendous loss we feel after losing these two family members from the sheriff’s office,” Mascara said in the statement.

The sheriff recognized the importance of mental health.

“While it is impossible for us to fully understand the private circumstances that led to this devastating loss, we pray that this tragedy will become a catalyst for change,” he said. “A catalyst to help lessen the stigma surrounding mental wellness and normalize the conversation about the challenges so many of us face on a regular basis. “

On Friday, the sheriff’s office shared an additional donation page for Jayce based on an “outpouring of support” in the wake of the tragedy.

A spokesperson for the St. Lucie County Sheriff’s Office did not comment further to TODAY.

A native of Florida, Osteen served in the Marine Corps and led the Marines infantry as a non-commissioned officer before his job as a sheriff’s deputy, according to his obituary. He was named MP of the Year in 2020 and would have turned 25 on January 14.

Pachecho, known as “Tori”, was remembered as a “confident, strong-willed and fearless young woman” who loved her son, her “fur babies” and had adventures like swimming with sharks.

Osteen and Pacheco will be laid to rest on Saturday, according to their online obituaries from Haisley Funeral Home.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, text HOME at 741741 or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/ressources for additional resources.



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Tupper Lake Mayor discusses state grant of $ 10 million DRI to Adirondack village https://www.smlxtralarge.com/tupper-lake-mayor-discusses-state-grant-of-10-million-dri-to-adirondack-village/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 17:46:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/tupper-lake-mayor-discusses-state-grant-of-10-million-dri-to-adirondack-village/ The Adirondack Village of Tupper Lake received a $ 10 million Downtown Revitalization Grant, or DRI, as part of the fifth round of the state’s economic development initiative. The state reviewed the village’s record of over $ 60 million in private and public investment in its Uptown district since 2014. State officials said DRI funds […]]]>

The Adirondack Village of Tupper Lake received a $ 10 million Downtown Revitalization Grant, or DRI, as part of the fifth round of the state’s economic development initiative. The state reviewed the village’s record of over $ 60 million in private and public investment in its Uptown district since 2014. State officials said DRI funds would capitalize on those investments.

Barely reelected in November, Mayor Paul Maroun said he, the village board and residents are delighted to receive the award.

Remember this was our first time trying it. Several towns and villages have tried once or twice or three to obtain it. So we have a good package. We’ve got a shovel-ready package and we’re good to go. I have spoken already since it was announced, I have spoken to the person in the State Department who will be managing the program. And of course everyone thinks that once you get a DRI, you’re just getting started. Well, everything, every project that we come up with could take place in a DRI now has to come back to the drawing board. So it’s up to Albany and they have to approve the project. But we really hope this DRI will improve the appearance of downtown Main Street Tupper Lake and downtown Tupper Lake. This will hopefully give us the momentum to promote at least one hotel and possibly another in Tupper Lake. It’s going to help the Arts Center, which, if you’ve been to Tupper Lake lately, Pat, has the Arts Center. Right next door is the State Theater, they recently bought it. One big project is the Oval Wood Dish Corporation which is converting the old lumber mill, which once employed 500 people in Tupper Lake, into 90 housing units and commercial space for, hopefully, a brewery that will put bottled and canned there. So we have a lot of projects ready to go as well as the waterfront improvements to the Ballpark stadium and the waterfront itself. So we’re good to go and people are very excited about it.

Paul Maroun many communities have projects like this and they will also say that they are ready to start. You mentioned earlier that this is the first time you have applied for the DRI. Why do you think yours stood out so well that you got the funds on your first try?

I don’t want to belittle any other community because, as you know, I love the North Country and everything in it. But we had private investors who had the money up front ready to combine with the DRI funds to make these projects happen. For example, OWD Corporation, the Syracuse group, which has already completed these projects in Utica and Syracuse at Franklin Square, is ready to go and has the financial backing to move the project forward. This project is therefore ready to start. Often people say yes, we have a project ready to go. I have a hotel in Tupper Lake that has been languishing for eight years now. Now they tell me that they have the financial backing of several banks to move forward. So when you have a combination of a good project, a good source group running the project, and the private money supporting it, that puts you in front of a lot of people who were willing to embark on a project but not. didn’t have the private support to help move it forward.

Paul, this is a $ 10 million crown investment and you’ve listed a number of different projects that sometimes involve public-private partnership investments. How much of the state’s $ 10 million DRI fund will allow Tupper Lake, you know, to rethink the vision you have and the redevelopment efforts that are underway?

Well I think it’s going to push quite a bit. First of all, however, you understand that when you get $ 10 million there is money that the state somehow gets back because it has to hire an engineer. They hire an engineering firm to study the plans we give them. Let us take the example of the hotel project. They should review this with their engineers. They have already announced the engineering company. This is the same group that runs the Saranac Lake DRI, so that’s good to know. So you start with about $ 9.2 million. But it’s going to push some of these groups that, even with private money, didn’t have enough to cross the line, it’s going to move them forward. So I think you’re going to see a lot of construction at Tupper Lake over the next 10 months. I’m very hopeful, Pat, I’m hopeful that we can get this started quickly. I have a good committee that I had to send to Albany. They have to approve the names. But I think you will see construction before the end of 2022 with the money from DRI.

Paul Maroun, you are the mayor of Tupper Lake and this year you envision a distribution of DRIs across the state where the communities could have obtained 10 or 20 million dollars. In some cases the price was split and in this case that is what happened. Two communities received $ 10 million each. So when you submitted the application to try to get the DRI, did you actually have separate plans for either scenario, whether you got the $ 10 million or the $ 20 million?

Well, actually, this is the first year that there was $ 20 million. It was always $ 10 million before. And I kind of thought it could go east and west. So as Massena came to the west of us and us. I thought Clayton might be involved because of their hotel and everything going on there. But we were prepared. We could have managed $ 20 million. But we did not put a number. We put the projects and why we thought they were important to the economic growth of Tupper Lake, the Tri-Lakes and the North Country. And I think that’s what made it. We did not specify how much we were going to get.

Do you actually have funds on hand at this point or is it still to come at this point?

No, we don’t have the funds on hand. And I have a nice check, a big wall check, a photo check that says $ 10 million. But everything has to be approved in Albany before the funds start pouring in. And we don’t have any real money in the bank. I mean, let’s say in some banks we don’t have money in there. But we know it has been awarded and appropriated. So, as soon as the projects are approved by the local committee and the state committee that is proposed for it, you can start using them after construction has started. So we are ready. We are ready to go.

So it’s like a pot of money and then you send …

Yes

… a bit like an invoice?

You send the plan to Albany and say we’re looking for, let’s just say $ 1.5 million to start this OWD project, both on the business side and on the housing side. If they approve the project and the project starts, they start getting their money back.

And, Paul, how many ancillary developments do you foresee because of the DRI that is not associated with it?

Anytime you get New York State $ 10 Million and get a big hit like we’ve done here and across the state, commercial banks are obviously watching it, and so are private investors. . So they also know that something going on in a community gets a 10 million dollar state grant and that propels you to other things in the future from people moving to the Adirondacks and Tri-Lakes. and Tupper Lake. So I think this is going to have a very important and impressive side effect for Tupper Lake and the surrounding area.

Massena was North Country’s other $ 10 million recipient in the fifth round of the Downtown Revitalization Initiative.


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Yarrow Brown: Use ARPA Funds for the iImpact Strategic Community | Business https://www.smlxtralarge.com/yarrow-brown-use-arpa-funds-for-the-iimpact-strategic-community-business/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/yarrow-brown-use-arpa-funds-for-the-iimpact-strategic-community-business/ Brown It is important to recognize how amazing our community has been over the past year and to recognize its progress in breaking down barriers and finding creative housing solutions. This remains a major challenge and we must continue to work together to resolve it. It affects us all – the private, public and not-for-profit […]]]>






Brown


It is important to recognize how amazing our community has been over the past year and to recognize its progress in breaking down barriers and finding creative housing solutions. This remains a major challenge and we must continue to work together to resolve it. It affects us all – the private, public and not-for-profit sectors.

There is still a long way to go, but we have reached over 50 of our 139 local governments working to become more ‘housing ready’ and provide achievable housing opportunities.

We delivered advocacy training and helped two new housing action groups train and work towards a Housing Ready program director to bring more housing to their communities.

We have worked with our partners on important legislative changes through the State Senate.

Our voices are heard in many areas, even in Lansing, where state agencies are considering more collaborative programs for rural communities.

There is still work to be done. Our communities have not been fully housing ready and we need to be prepared to deploy new tools and incentives in other parts of the state.

The pandemic is something we never wanted and has had an impact on our communities.

But we have an opportunity that requires us to be collaborative and strategic with the funds of the American Recovery Plan Act (or ARPA).

At Housing North, we have one goal: housing! Along with our partners, we are working to remove barriers to housing in our 10-county region.

We know housing is linked to so many things – child care, wages, mental health and more.

Without a community that meets its housing needs, there is no real progress.

Through our Coalition for Local Community Development, the Coalition for a Strong and Prosperous Michigan (https://www.miroadmap.com/) and our community, we can provide clear direction to our Senators and Representatives on how this ARPA funding can have the most impact and be leveraged to continue in perpetuity.

We can share strategic ways to use this funding to have a lasting impact in our region.

In Northwest Michigan and other rural communities, we sometimes get lost in the mix with lower-state areas and are often not eligible for incentives or programs for various reasons.

Our biggest fear at Housing North is that this money will not be set aside for communities like ours – places that don’t have community development staff or walking scores that make them competitive for programs, for provide support to developers and communities who want to provide housing.

We live in a world where the average house price is $ 250,000, but our average wage is less than $ 20 an hour.

If you earn $ 20 an hour and buy or rent a home that is considered “affordable” at 30% of your income, that works out to $ 1,000 per month, or a house of about $ 165,000. It is almost impossible to find a home at this price.

We need more than 14,000 homes in our 10-county area over the next four years, the majority needed for people earning less than $ 40,000 a year.

How do we make sure there is enough housing for our workers year round, many of whom are making $ 20 an hour or less?

What is our responsibility as community members, nonprofits, elected officials and businesses to ensure that everyone has housing and that it remains affordable in the long run?

We are finding opportunities to use ARPA funds for many programs and needs in our communities, including housing.

We are convinced that these funds can be used to help find housing and create a revolving loan fund. Housing North is there to help communities invest in housing and housing programs.

The Michigan Municipal League coalition is working diligently to bring a plan to lawmakers in our states. We encourage you to review this plan, join the coalition and contact your elected officials.

From what we understand, Michigan lags behind many states in allocating ARPA funds. We must make sure we seize the opportunity to collaborate and be strategic with these funds to meet the needs of our communities.

Through our local community development coalition in five counties, we know that the top priorities are housing, youth mental health and child care.

Let’s make sure these funds are used to advance those priorities and make our communities stronger, more diverse and more resilient in the months and years to come.

Please contact your elected officials and let them know that you support this coalition and that you want ARPA funds directed to programs that will impact Northwest Michigan. You can find more information on our website accommodationnord.org or to mml.org.


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