Support Organization – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 02:38:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-150x150.png Support Organization – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ 32 32 Answer The Call Foundation pledges financial support to family of slain NYPD officer Jason Rivera – CBS New York https://www.smlxtralarge.com/answer-the-call-foundation-pledges-financial-support-to-family-of-slain-nypd-officer-jason-rivera-cbs-new-york/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 01:39:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/answer-the-call-foundation-pledges-financial-support-to-family-of-slain-nypd-officer-jason-rivera-cbs-new-york/ NEW YORK (CBS New York) – The Answer the Call Foundation said it will provide financial support to the family of NYPD officer Jason Rivera, who was shot and killed while responding to a domestic dispute in Harlem on Friday. The foundation immediately donates $25,000 to Rivera’s spouse. READ MORE: Lashawn McNeil, suspect in fatal […]]]>
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Detroit Department of Water and Sewer Announces New Director of Opportunities and Inclusion https://www.smlxtralarge.com/detroit-department-of-water-and-sewer-announces-new-director-of-opportunities-and-inclusion/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 08:56:25 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/detroit-department-of-water-and-sewer-announces-new-director-of-opportunities-and-inclusion/
Detroit Department of Water and Sewer Announces New Director Position Focused on Opportunity and Inclusion
  • Tiffany Jones is DWSD’s first Director of Opportunities and Inclusion
  • Department makes major commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion for contractors, suppliers and employees
  • DWSD invests approximately $100 million annually in capital projects, in addition to other supplier contracts

DETROIT – The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD) announces a groundbreaking commitment to opportunity and inclusion for contractors, suppliers and employees. To support this bold vision, DWSD Director/CEO Gary Brown has selected Tiffany Jones as its first Director of Opportunities and Inclusion beginning this month.

The DWSD Director of Opportunities and Inclusion will develop and execute a work plan around the following areas specific to DWSD, and to support Mayor Mike Duggan’s citywide initiative to create inclusive opportunities for the Detroiters and the minorities. The four main objectives are:

  • Raise awareness and engage with construction and professional services companies with a focus on opportunities and inclusion for minority and Detroit-based contractors;
  • Develop DWSD contract incentives to comply with Mayor Duggan’s Executive Order 2016-1 that requires that at least 51% of hours worked on city contracts over $3 million be performed by Detroit residents ;
  • Implement a workforce development strategy to support the expansion of the lead service line replacement program to replace 5,000 pipes per year; and
  • Create strategies and initiatives around employee diversity and inclusion in promotion opportunities.

“This is a critical time in our history to engage minority and Detroit-based contractors in DWSD projects with more work to come,” Brown said. “With Tiffany’s background in public relations, her ability to engage the public, her in-depth knowledge of DWSD’s operations and her commitment to diversity and inclusion, she is the optimal choice to lead the organization to improve significantly opportunities and inclusion.”

Brown added that DWSD is in the midst of a five-year, $500 million capital improvement program to modernize aging water and sewer infrastructure. This program will accelerate in the coming years with additional dollars expected from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which in turn increases opportunities for minority and Detroit-based entrepreneurs.

Tiffany Jones was previously Director of Public Affairs and has held that position since joining DWSD in February 2018. Jones has over 20 years of public relations experience. At DWSD, she oversaw DWSD’s communications strategy, which included guiding messaging and writing standards across the organization. She led the launch of DWSD’s first coordinated advertising campaign, which continues to evolve, and worked with internal groups to develop outreach materials related to construction projects, including the creation of the Lead Service Line Replacement Program package. . For the past two years, she has managed and facilitated DWSD’s annual construction contractor workshops.

Jones received a master’s degree in public relations from Ball State University and a bachelor’s degree in communications from North Carolina A&T State University. She is also a graduate of the Detroit Regional Chamber’s Detroit XXXVII Leadership Class.

Bryan Peckinpaugh, previously deputy director of public affairs for the DWSD, has been promoted to director of public affairs.

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About Detroit Water and Sewer
The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD) serves more than 230,000 accounts, including a residential population of nearly 700,000. DWSD’s water system consists of more than 2,700 miles of water mains and more than 30,000 fire hydrants, and the combined sewer collection system has nearly 3,000 miles of water pipes. sewer, more than 90,000 cesspools and 16 stormwater green infrastructure projects in the city of Detroit. Beginning in June 2019, DWSD launched a five-year, $500 million program to begin addressing aging infrastructure, including replacing lead service lines. To learn more about DWSD, or to request water services, make payments, register for assistance programs, or report water or sewer emergencies, call DWSD Customer Service at 313-267- 8000, use the Improve Detroit mobile app or visit www.detroitmi. govt/dwsd.

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To support LGBTQ kids, Kansas parents and teachers must stand up against discriminatory practices https://www.smlxtralarge.com/to-support-lgbtq-kids-kansas-parents-and-teachers-must-stand-up-against-discriminatory-practices/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 09:37:31 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/to-support-lgbtq-kids-kansas-parents-and-teachers-must-stand-up-against-discriminatory-practices/ The Kansas Reflector welcomes opinion pieces from writers who share our goal of expanding the conversation about how public policy affects the daily lives of people across our state. Rachel Showstack is an associate professor of Spanish at Wichita State University and founder of Alce su voz, an organization that supports health equity for Spanish […]]]>

The Kansas Reflector welcomes opinion pieces from writers who share our goal of expanding the conversation about how public policy affects the daily lives of people across our state. Rachel Showstack is an associate professor of Spanish at Wichita State University and founder of Alce su voz, an organization that supports health equity for Spanish speakers in Kansas.

When I attended a pep rally at my child’s pre-K-12 college preparatory academy in Wichita a few years ago, I was amazed at how the teenagers performing on the basketball court in front of the audience were so succinctly divided between the girls – few dressed up cheerleaders and a homecoming queen and princess – and boys – football players and a king and a prince of back home.

Interactions around homecoming royalty assumed heterosexuality, with jokes and games about the king and queen being physically attracted to each other. As a cisgender, straight adult with a fluid gender expression, I was uncomfortable during the rally and spent the afternoon and evening wondering how the LGBTQ children in the audience felt.

About a year later, when my child started to question his own gender identity, he mentioned to me that the teachers at school often divided the children into a group of boys and a group of girls for activities. , and that the computer lab had boys games (shooting) and girls games (dress up).

My child pointed out to a teacher in the school’s summer program that this kind of categorization can make a non-binary person feel left out. The teacher’s response was, “We don’t have that here.”

In other words, she told my non-binary child, a sophomore at school, that the school had no non-binary students. I can still feel the rage rising in my chest when I imagine that teacher responding to my child with those words.

That’s when I started advocating for the school to provide gender and sexual awareness and inclusivity training for their teachers and connected the head of the school with the president of the Kansas Chapter of GLSEN. Since the school ironically proclaims inclusivity as one of its main pillars, I was concerned for children who might not perceive school as a safe space to express themselves freely.

Public health research has shown that LGBTQ youth experience higher rates of depression, suicidality, and victimization, compared to their heterosexual and cisgender peers. Teachers who choose to be allies play an important role in making these children feel included.

The school administration’s consistent response to my plea was a warm “we care about inclusiveness,” as well as small steps in the right direction. Several months into our interactions on the subject, the school principal informed me that a professional development committee would include the voices of LGBTQ staff in planning an internal summer internship. It didn’t seem appropriate to me to put these staff in charge of informing teaching about LGBT inclusivity, but at least it was better than complete inaction.

Another positive step was that the academy’s primary school headmaster bought allies stickers for teachers and started reminding them to use gender-neutral language and respect children’s pronouns.

As my child’s school administration stumbles toward inclusivity, homophobia and transphobia are rampant in school boards across the state. As noted by Kansas Reflector Opinion Editor Clay Wirestone, some Kansas Christian and conservative parents, advocates and lawmakers believe that inclusive school practices could be harmful to their children. The same Goddard school district ordered the removal of a selection of books with various characters, including gay and transgender characters, from its libraries, out of concern for whether the books met the schools’ educational goals.

During this time, my child, an avid reader, asked me why the books they read didn’t have many gay characters. As a mother who wants her child to understand that diverse gender identities and sexualities are normal and worthy of representation, I immediately investigated average-reader books with LGBTQ protagonists and quickly acquired a selection of new playback options.

During this time, my child, an avid reader, asked me why the books they read didn’t have many gay characters. As a mother who wants her child to understand that diverse gender identities and sexualities are normal and worthy of representation, I immediately investigated average-reader books with LGBTQ protagonists and quickly acquired a selection of new playback options.

A teacher who was an elementary librarian at my child’s school between 2019 and 2021 also got a collection of books with various characters from the GLSEN Rainbow Bookcase and asked me for more recommendations. Including books with diverse characters in school libraries is an important way to ensure that all students feel represented and an important part of teaching children to be open and accepting of human beings.

Outside of school, my child and I encountered a mixture of ignorance and inclusiveness. Last summer, at my child’s request, I cut her hair quite short. Then they tried a local YMCA day camp. Unfortunately, on the third day of camp, when my child started to enter the girls’ bathroom (which they always used), a camper and a counselor both warned them to read the sign, assuming my child was a boy and went to the wrong bathroom.

Unsurprisingly, my child refused to go to camp after that. Later that summer during their theater program they tried to avoid going to the bathroom during rehearsal because they were afraid something similar would happen, until we discussed their concerns with the program’s understanding and supportive teachers.

Since the camp incident, we have found an inclusive community in many places in Wichita. In my kid’s Dungeons and Dragons group, another parent asked the kids to do a “quick pronoun check” before they started playing. I was moved to tears by this simple gesture, as the children, who all came from inclusive families, simply walked around the table and said their pronouns.

At this point, my fourth-grader is probably more comfortable than I am discussing gender diversity and LGBTQ sexuality and identity, and is surrounded by friends and families of friends who have inclusive attitudes and practices. I don’t worry about my child. I worry about Kansas children in less inclusive families and communities who may struggle to find allies in school.

School boards can make it difficult for teachers to be allies. The Olathe School Board now requires teachers to get parental permission before addressing students with their preferred pronouns, and teachers are not allowed to ask students to share their preferred pronouns or names.

ACLU Kansas sent a open letter to council of olathe expressing concern that the new guidelines violate student privacy and the district’s own anti-discrimination policy, and encouraging the school board to adopt a comprehensive LGBTQ-inclusive policy.

Now is the time to support the ACLU and other organizations working to promote inclusive practices in schools. We can’t let homophobic and transphobic parents and school board members stop Kansas Public Schools from making all students feel included.

Meanwhile, private schools that pride themselves on inclusivity should lead the state in developing locally grounded programs that recognize the presence of LGBTQ individuals in local communities and at different periods in history, explore the experiences LGBTQ and family structures, and recognize the ways in which the English language and other world languages ​​are evolving to become more inclusive. Long-accepted traditions such as the reunion court and the all-girls cheerleading squad can also be modified to be more inclusive.

To help ensure that schools provide a safe and supportive environment for children, regardless of their gender identity or sexual orientation, parents, teachers and children can attend school board meetings to speak out against discriminatory policies and advocate. for the representation of diverse identities in school curricula. . For more information on how to make schools more inclusive of LGBTQ students, you can contact the Kansas Chapter of GLSEN by email [email protected].

Note: My child, now 10, read this column, approved it, and gave me permission to submit it for publication.

Through its opinion section, the Kansas Reflector works to amplify the voices of people who are affected by public policies or excluded from public debate. Find information, including how to submit your own review, here.

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3 ways companies can drive innovation and performance https://www.smlxtralarge.com/3-ways-companies-can-drive-innovation-and-performance/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 17:47:24 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/3-ways-companies-can-drive-innovation-and-performance/ Over the past two years, businesses have experienced unprecedented operational disruption and market uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, many business leaders give priority to innovation to gain in competitiveness and performance in 2022. This is easier said than done as the list of supposedly essential innovative practices is long and continues to grow. […]]]>

Over the past two years, businesses have experienced unprecedented operational disruption and market uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Thus, many business leaders give priority to innovation to gain in competitiveness and performance in 2022. This is easier said than done as the list of supposedly essential innovative practices is long and continues to grow. lie down.

For example, recent research shows that innovative companies, relative to their non-innovative counterparts, engage in many highly touted best practices. Although these practices can improve competitiveness, some are more important than others and their implementation in the absence of a strategy is very problematic.

As a marketing and innovation management researcher, I found that these complexities led me to two research questions. First, what type of organizational culture best supports the implementation of these innovative practices? And second, which of these practices universally improves business performance?

C. Brooke Dobni and I have investigated these questions in our next article in Research-technology management, an innovation management journal.

Global Innovation Study

In cooperation with national conference councils in the United States, Europe and Asia (nonprofit organizations that support research to help leaders address societal challenges), we collected data from 437 companies, in 11 sectors, in 27 countries.

Our results showed that an innovation-driven culture was needed to successfully implement crowdsourcing, gateway systems, design thinking, open innovation, big data analytics, innovation, scientific discovery and prototyping. However, only some of these practices have improved business performance.



Read more: How companies can determine if design thinking is right for them


Companies with strong innovation cultures have leaders who support innovation, dedicate resources to experimentation, pursue knowledge generation and dissemination, and have processes for testing and launching ideas. Great innovators are able to execute strategy, create competitive advantages, and achieve performance goals.

We found that highly innovative people were more successful in implementing all innovation practices. We also found that across industries, companies with a strong innovation culture outperformed their counterparts without a similar culture. Given its performance benefits, how do you create a culture of innovation?

Companies with a strong culture of innovation fare better than their competitors who do not encourage innovation.
(Piqsel)

Past insights from Fortune 1000 companies suggest leaders need to set innovation goals, encourage all employees to innovate in their roles, prioritize individual and organizational learning, remove the negative consequences of failure experimentation and support activities with incentives.

Based on the results of our study, we argue that an innovation-driven culture is the necessary first step. It is only once companies have created an enabling environment that they can attempt to implement innovative practices.

Innovation at the service of performance

Companies across all industries have experienced the performance-enhancing benefits of crowdsourcing, open innovation, innovation management software, scientific discovery, and prototyping:

We recommend that companies explore implementing these innovative practices as they have universal performance benefits. But it’s important to remember that engaging in such practices should be guided by organizational strategy, and a culture of innovation is the necessary first step.

Less successful innovative practices

While there’s a lot of hype around stage-gate systems, design thinking, and big data analytics, our research shows that only companies in specific industries benefit from these practices.

Stage-Gate systems are a linear process involving a series of sequential steps to launch new products. We argue that the innovation process is anything but linear and that such a rigid process is not conducive to most industries.

Our data confirms that Stage Gate systems are most effective in manufacturing, IT, and healthcare environments, but not others.

Design thinking, an approach that uses a designer’s sensibility and methods to match consumer needs with what is technologically feasible, is nebulous and even hazy among those who practice it.

We argue that the ambiguity of design thinking is the reason only companies in the arts and entertainment, retail, and marketing sectors have benefited from its benefits.



Read more: Why designers arrived in corporate boardrooms


Surprisingly, big data analytics – collecting, interpreting, and making decisions based on large data sets – has only benefited companies in certain industries. Upon closer examination, we found that only companies in industries that conventionally managed and interpreted large amounts of data (such as finance, healthcare, and IT) realized such value. We believe this speaks more to the inability of some companies to manage big data than to its value.

Managerial advice

We offer managers three ways to fuel and foster innovation based on our research:

  1. All executives should seek to create a culture of innovation.

  2. Once a culture of innovation is established, companies need to strategically engage in some of the universally beneficial practices.

  3. Some practices should be avoided altogether because their benefits are limited to specific industries.

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Cotati fundraising focuses on supporting the arts https://www.smlxtralarge.com/cotati-fundraising-focuses-on-supporting-the-arts/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 01:59:28 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/cotati-fundraising-focuses-on-supporting-the-arts/ Cannabis dispensary Mercy Wellness teamed up with local artists on Saturday to host a fundraiser in Cotati to benefit the nonprofit Santa Rosa Arts Center. The outdoor event took place in front of the company’s Redwood Drive store. In keeping with Sonoma County’s temporary ban on large gatherings to slow the spread of COVID-19, crowds […]]]>

Cannabis dispensary Mercy Wellness teamed up with local artists on Saturday to host a fundraiser in Cotati to benefit the nonprofit Santa Rosa Arts Center.

The outdoor event took place in front of the company’s Redwood Drive store.

In keeping with Sonoma County’s temporary ban on large gatherings to slow the spread of COVID-19, crowds were limited in size. Social distancing and masks were necessary and all transactions were cashless, according to Chris Myers, chief marketing officer of Mercy Wellness.

The event featured a silent auction as well as a variety of arts and crafts for sale, including paintings and jewelry. According to Myers, the performers in attendance had previously worked with Mercy Wellness on giveaways for its customer loyalty program or had been introduced to the company through word of mouth.

Artists included painter and muralist Arsenio Baca, graphic designer Vinnie Schraner and Sebastopol gallery owner Lori Austin.

“We thought that [fundraiser] was a great opportunity to bring their art into the community and give them a little more attention,” Myers said.

Each artist donated a piece to the auction, with proceeds going to the South A Street Arts Centre. The dispensary plans to match all funds raised, according to Myers.

Presented centrally by the Lori Austin Gallery, Mercy Wellness has been impressed with its focus on expanding arts programs throughout the county, including with minorities and the LGBTQ community. It’s “just the right kind” of organization the company wants to support, according to Myers.

The center was founded in 2014 and promotes the arts in Santa Rosa through art classes for all ages, exhibits, and live performances.

For more information, visit santarosaartscenter.org.

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Ethiopia withdraws appointment of WHO boss for ‘supporting’ TPLF https://www.smlxtralarge.com/ethiopia-withdraws-appointment-of-who-boss-for-supporting-tplf/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/ethiopia-withdraws-appointment-of-who-boss-for-supporting-tplf/ By AGGREY MUTAMBO Ethiopia said on Thursday it would not support the re-election of its national Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus for a second term as director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), accusing him of backing a group proscribed. Accusations of supporting the TPLF In a letter to the WHO Executive Board, the Ethiopian Foreign […]]]>

By AGGREY MUTAMBO

Ethiopia said on Thursday it would not support the re-election of its national Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus for a second term as director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), accusing him of backing a group proscribed.

Accusations of supporting the TPLF

In a letter to the WHO Executive Board, the Ethiopian Foreign Ministry said Dr Tedros, himself a former foreign minister, threatens the organizational integrity of the WHO because he took sides. for a group banned in his native country.

“He has failed to live up to the integrity and professional expectations required of his office and position,” says the letter sent to the Board, currently chaired by Dr Patrick Amoth, a Kenyan obstetrician and gynecologist and chief executive. from the Kenyan Ministry of Health.

“He has interfered in the internal affairs of Ethiopia, including Ethiopia’s relations with the State of Eritrea…continues to be an active member and supporter of the TPLF which is outlawed as a terrorist group by the Ethiopian parliament.

Ethiopia has said it wants the Executive Board, a 34-member body of the WHO, to investigate Dr Tedros’ conduct for breach of his “professional and legal responsibility”.

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But the letter was sent ahead of a crucial 150th Council session when it will ‘select’ Dr Tedros’s candidacy for his second term as Director-General.

Amendments

The Council is due to meet for its annual meeting from January 24-29 to agree on the agenda for the World Health Assembly as well as to consider candidates for the next Director General elections, which are due to take place in May during of the 75and World Health Assembly.

The Assembly will only vote on candidates put forward by the Council and since nominations closed in November, only the Ethiopian incumbent has expressed interest in the seat.

In October, Kenya, Rwanda and Botswana wrote to the Council endorsing Dr Tedros’ candidacy.

Nairobi diplomats say Kenya is backing Dr Tedros to complete his maximum two-term five-year tour because it is “Africa’s turn”.

After serving under two critical disease outbreaks: the Ebola outbreak in the DRC in 2018 and the Covid-19 pandemic since late 2019, Dr Tedros passed his toughest exams yet, according to Kenya.

His candidacy was also supported by the European Union, Barbados, Bahrain, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Malta, Oman, Indonesia and Kazakhstan.

Traditionally, being nominated by one of the 194 members of the WHO Assembly, not necessarily one’s home country, is enough to run for the seat.

But Ethiopia wants him out of the running for allegedly blowing the TPLF horn on the world stage.

denies the charges

Earlier in 2021, Addis Ababa claimed it had tried to acquire arms and diplomatic support for the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF), a movement that was part of the ruling coalition when it was a minister, but now considered a terrorist group by Ethiopia.

The TPLF has been fighting Ethiopian forces and allied regional militias since November 2020.

Tedros denied siding with the TPLF and claimed that his own family had been hurt in the dispute.

Ethiopia has yet to give its public endorsement, but it will be curious if they chose to undermine it.

On Thursday, Ethiopia said it had celebrated TPLF victories and engaged in selective outrage, including exaggerating the humanitarian situation in Ethiopia.

Tedros has yet to respond to the blame, but has in the past denied Ethiopia’s accusations, although he admitted his relatives were affected by the Tigray war.

The Executive Board of WHO, in accordance with Assembly resolution WHA65.15, can only reject a candidate if it is demonstrated that he lacks technical knowledge in a field of health, that he lacks demonstrable leadership and advocacy skills, is incompetent, lacks sensitivity to cultural, social and political considerations. differences, is in poor health or has breached WHO or UN codes of conduct.

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Born in March 1965 in Asmara, the current Eritrea, the Ethiopian biologist was Minister of Health then Foreign Affairs of his country under Prime Minister Meles Zenawi then Hailemariam Desalegn.

He is credited with reducing new HIV infections in his country at the time and pioneered a universal healthcare system that Ethiopia attempted to implement.

When he took over as head of the WHO in 2017, he became the first African to do so, the first person to be elected from multiple candidates and the only non-doctor to hold the seat.

His campaign was led by both Ethiopia and Kenya, received the endorsement of the African Union and was widely supported by China, against the United States, United Kingdom and Canada who had backed British physician David Nabarro for the job.

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5 Ways Managers Can Support Pregnant Employees https://www.smlxtralarge.com/5-ways-managers-can-support-pregnant-employees/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 13:14:50 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/5-ways-managers-can-support-pregnant-employees/ Although there are laws against pregnancy-related discrimination in the workplace, discrimination is still common. In fact, statistics show that there have been nearly 15,000 complaints of pregnancy discrimination filed in the United States over the past five years. While we know that discrimination can have real consequences for a pregnant employee’s career outcomes, including lower […]]]>

Although there are laws against pregnancy-related discrimination in the workplace, discrimination is still common. In fact, statistics show that there have been nearly 15,000 complaints of pregnancy discrimination filed in the United States over the past five years. While we know that discrimination can have real consequences for a pregnant employee’s career outcomes, including lower pay, promotions and social capital, an open question is whether there are any consequences. on the health of pregnant employees or their babies.

To answer this question, we conducted two studies examining the workplace experiences and health outcomes of new mothers and their babies. We found that experiences of discrimination during pregnancy were linked to increased stress for mothers, which increased their risk for postpartum depression. This stress has also resulted in lower birth weight, lower gestational ages, and increased doctor visits for babies a few weeks after birth. While it may seem obvious that pregnancy-related discrimination has a negative impact on pregnant employees, we were surprised to find that it had an indirect impact on the babies they carried while they were discriminated against. . This shows the profound implications of discrimination in the workplace and highlights the importance of addressing it.

We recently followed up with the same employees and found that within a few years of birth the babies had caught up: they did not experience any continued ill effects from the discrimination and stress experienced by their mothers during pregnancy. But mothers continued to suffer from poorer health, depressive symptoms and parental stress. Our results therefore suggest that pregnancy-related discrimination may have long-term consequences on maternal health.

It is essential that employers take concrete steps to prevent pregnancy-related discrimination in the workplace. They can promote a more positive organizational environment and offer support by engaging in the following five evidence-based practices.

Help negotiate parental benefits for their employees

Managers are in a unique position to provide the kind of support at work that pregnant employees need to reduce stress throughout pregnancy. Pregnant employees tend to disclose their pregnancy after the first trimester, and the manager is probably one of the first people they do. As such, a manager’s initial reaction can shape perceptions of future treatment and therefore impact stress. While it is important to have a supportive tone at the time of disclosure, knowing the parenting benefits of the business in advance can be especially helpful. Without federally mandated parental leave, the benefits offered vary widely from organization to organization, and managers are uniquely positioned to help employees use all available organizational resources to support them.

Additionally, it is important that managers maintain an open dialogue with their employees about the types of support they need throughout their pregnancy. Well-meaning supervisors sometimes mistakenly assume that a reduced workload is beneficial when this is not always the case. Not only can a reduced workload unintentionally result in financial stress, a pregnant employee can also experience it as demeaning or even discriminatory. Open dialogue allows the employee to communicate their needs and the manager to champion the use of all benefits.

Offer flexible working options

Managers can help pregnant employees by providing flexible working arrangements, such as remote working and flexible hours. Such options are win-win, as they allow employees to better cope with their work and non-work responsibilities, thus improving performance while reducing stress. For example, remote working can enable employees to meet their professional demands when suffering from a pregnancy-related illness.

However, pregnant employees may be reluctant to use flexible working arrangements if they feel it may cause others to perceive them as not committing to their work or if they fear further harm to their careers. As such, managers are essential in normalizing the mindset that flexible working arrangements are rights, not special privileges. Additionally, when managers model healthy behaviors at work and in private life using company resources to meet their own personal and professional needs, it signals to employees that these resources are available and encouraged to be used by. the employees.

Special leave for doctor’s appointments

Prenatal care requires regular and increasingly frequent medical appointments. Appointments with antenatal care providers usually take place at least once a month until week 28 of pregnancy, when they switch to every two weeks until week 36. During the last four weeks of pregnancy, 36 to 40 weeks, pregnant women typically see their provider once a week. For people with additional considerations, such as health issues, older age, or multiple babies, the visits may be even more frequent.

In addition to visiting antenatal care providers regularly, pregnant workers often need to see several other providers, as pregnancy affects all health systems. For example, dental, nutritional and sleep needs change during pregnancy. Allowing pregnant employees to leave early, arrive late and / or work remotely when having appointments is of critical importance to the health of the baby and the employee.

Facilitate interactions with colleagues

In another study recently published by some of us, the results suggest that there are concrete strategies that employers can adopt to reduce the negative effects on the health and well-being of pregnant employees. Specifically, the data suggests that co-workers and supportive supervisors act as stress reduction resources for them.

As part of this research, we asked pregnant employees to report their daily experiences of stress and social support during pregnancy. The results showed that employees who felt supported by both co-workers and supervisors benefited from the greatest reductions in prenatal stress. Additionally, this stress reduction was associated with long-term reductions in postpartum depression and faster physical recovery after childbirth.

Since pregnant employees enjoy better mental health when receiving social support, it is essential to facilitate supportive interactions with coworkers before and after birth. Managers should ask pregnant employees how they can help create social opportunities among employees during working hours or before / after working hours, whether by organizing coffee breaks, mentoring relationships or a group employee resources. Pregnant employees may also wish to maintain some form of connection with their coworkers and supervisors after their leave from work, perhaps through a mailing list or Zoom meetings. It’s important to note that managers should always defer to the preferences of the pregnant employee – some people may find social interactions exhausting, while others may find them essential. Providing pregnant employees with several different socialization options will demonstrate attention to their needs and the flexibility to meet them. In addition, all employees benefit from a strong social bond at work.

Intentionally create an inclusive organizational climate

Inclusive behaviors signal that all employees are welcomed and valued, regardless of their gender, health, parental status or any other dimension of difference. This allows employees of all identities to flourish more. Research shows that inclusive leadership can promote psychological safety and help teams deal with differences effectively. According to a recent study by Catalyst.org, employee inclusion experiences are directly linked to managers’ inclusive leadership behaviors.

Managers can create an inclusive organizational climate by intentionally asking questions about their pregnant employees’ experiences at work and actively listening to what pregnant employees have to say. Managers should focus on empathizing with the experiences of pregnant employees and identifying and changing any practices that may be exclusive. For example, they can actively disrupt behaviors that reinforce biased behaviors and model inclusive behaviors for others to follow. It is important to create an inclusive organizational climate to develop and maintain the psychological safety of pregnant employees.

Although illegal, pregnancy-related discrimination still takes place in the workplace, and our research suggests that it can have serious consequences for pregnant employees and their babies. Given that around 85% of working women will be pregnant at some point in their careers, we recommend that managers take action to tackle this discrimination head-on. Most importantly, we recommend that managers strive to maintain an open dialogue with pregnant employees about the types of support they need.

Editor’s Note: Pamela L. Perrewé, Ashley Mandeville, Asia Eaton, Lilia M. Cortina, and Yingge Li contributed to this article.

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Illinois abortion providers see surge in out-of-state patients as reproductive rights disappear in Midwest https://www.smlxtralarge.com/illinois-abortion-providers-see-surge-in-out-of-state-patients-as-reproductive-rights-disappear-in-midwest/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 15:01:16 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/illinois-abortion-providers-see-surge-in-out-of-state-patients-as-reproductive-rights-disappear-in-midwest/ CHICAGO – Health care groups that help people end their pregnancies safely expect an increase in the number of foreigners coming to Illinois as federal abortion protections are on the line. The conservative Supreme Court majority signaled it could uphold an abortion ban in Mississippi, potentially overthrowing Roe v. Wade, who established a national right […]]]>

CHICAGO – Health care groups that help people end their pregnancies safely expect an increase in the number of foreigners coming to Illinois as federal abortion protections are on the line.

The conservative Supreme Court majority signaled it could uphold an abortion ban in Mississippi, potentially overthrowing Roe v. Wade, who established a national right to abortion before a pregnancy is 23 weeks.

“Everything we’ve seen so far indicates that the Supreme Court is prepared to ignore half a century of federal law and defeat the right to abortion,” said Jennifer Welch, President and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Illinois. “I am very worried.”

In December, justices of the highest court also allowed prosecution of a Texas law banning abortion after six weeks, although they said providers could sue. Other states have introduced mock “trigger laws”, including Ohio and Tennessee, which would impose more restrictions on access to abortion if the Supreme Court diminished the protections offered by Roe v. Wade.

If these laws were passed, residents who need such health care could be forced to come elsewhere, such as Illinois.

“In both of these cases, Illinois will be the closest place for patients to come in for service,” Welch said.

As many as 26 states have “trigger laws” in place – including all of the states bordering Illinois, Welch said.

“Tens of thousands of people will be in this great abortion desert. Illinois is already serving as a haven in the Midwest for abortion care, and it’s just going to multiply, ”Welch said.

And although Chicago and Illinois have created protections against abortion, the region is no stranger to controversy over the issue. This weekend, a group of anti-choice activists marched through the city center.

And Illinois had a trigger law until November 2017, when the government of the day. Bruce Rauner signed a bill that struck down the law, which would have made abortions illegal in the state had the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade. The bill also authorized funding for abortions through Medicaid and state employee medicare.

In 2019, Illinois passed state law protecting the right to reproductive health care, including abortion. This decision effectively designated Illinois as a destination for foreigners seeking abortions.

In 2019, 7,534 non-residents underwent abortions in Illinois, up from 5,668 in 2018 and 2,970 in 2014, according to the state health department.

Illinois abortion funds and providers have braced for a surge in people coming from out of state for treatment even before recent Supreme Court cases. They said they have seen a gradual increase in the number of people making appointments and calling their hotlines over the past few years.

“We saw it coming as soon as the former president placed so many arch-conservatives on the Supreme Court,” Welch said. “For example, we have built new health centers over the past two years, one in Flossmoor and one in Waukegan. We have built the physical infrastructure to meet the demand and we are also planning ways to expand the capacity of all of our health centers.

“We’re here for people, regardless of your zip code. It is an unnecessary burden on people’s mental health that this particular care is so stigmatized.

The Chicago Abortion Fund – which provides logistical, financial and emotional support to people during their abortion process – has also seen a “dramatic increase” in demand, with more and more people calling and seeking help. to travel to Illinois in the past two years, said executive director of the fund Megan Jeyifo.

To prepare for the potential limits to abortion access, “providers are preparing and hiring more people,” Jeyifo said.

The Chicago Abortion Fund has focused on increasing its capacity, infrastructure and money while “sounding the alarm bells” to “continue to support people at the same level, with the increased “demand for abortions in Illinois,” Jeyifo said.

Despite the organization’s planning efforts, Jeyifo said she worried about the ability of abortion funds and providers to handle the increased demand, as potentially half the country could soon enact laws. forcing residents to travel to have an abortion.

“Illinois is such a critical state in our region. It’s terrible – people are going to be forced to stay pregnant, ”Jeyifo said.

The Chicago Abortion Fund has supported about 3,000 people who traveled to Illinois for an abortion last year, up from about 1,500 in 2020 and 183 in 2018, Jefiyo said. The majority of callers are from Indiana, Missouri, Wisconsin and Iowa, although the fund has supported people from Mississippi, Kentucky, Ohio, Arkansas, Louisiana and Tennessee, Jefiyo said.

“The Supreme Court’s inability to act in Texas has heightened awareness of the circumstances in which people already find themselves – and it truly is a frightening time,” Jeyifo said. “Protecting the legal right to abortion in court is absolutely essential, but it is not enough either.

“We need to do more because the legal right to abortion is ostensibly protected at this time, and abortion is still not available for thousands of people in our region due to economic hardship or lack of coverage. insurance.

Restricting access to abortion means “people have to travel further and pay more for their travel and for their procedures,” said Madison Lyleroehr, board member for the Midwest Access Coalition. The organization provides support to people seeking abortions in the Midwest. Since 2015, it has helped more than 2,000 people in 29 states access abortion.

“Even without Roe falling, it’s really hard for a lot of people to access abortion, and it has been for a long time,” said Lyleroehr.

Lyleroehr said the financial support provided by the coalition most often goes to people’s accommodation and travel, “whether it is reimbursing gasoline, buses, trains or – for people who have to travel from longer distances – plane tickets “. The group also helps finance food and childcare.

Six in ten people who have an abortion are already mothers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Half of them have two or more children, reports The New York Times.

“We have certainly seen a slight increase [in demand] with Texas law in September, ”Lyleroehr said. “There is no reason not to anticipate a steep rise in the event that Roe falls.”

Like Jeyifo, Lyleroehr is concerned that providers in Illinois may not be able to handle an influx of patients if Roe v. Wade is canceled.

“Even in Illinois, there are only a limited number of appointments available. There are only a limited number of open clinics, ”said Lyleroehr. “When you try to serve not only your own state, but people in other states as well, it will make people wait longer, and the longer you have to wait to get an abortion, the more expensive it will be. “

In places like Missouri, Mississippi, North Dakota, and South Dakota, there is only one clinic per state, making abortion inaccessible to people who cannot travel far for it. procedure.

And about half of the women who had an abortion in 2014 were below the poverty line, with another quarter very close to poverty, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a research and policy group focused on sexual health and reproductive.

“It’s a cycle where you run into a financial hurdle, and then by the time you’ve saved enough money, the cost of the procedure has gone up or the cost of a plane ticket has gone up,” Lyleroehr said.

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United Service Organizations opens new center at SLC Airport https://www.smlxtralarge.com/united-service-organizations-opens-new-center-at-slc-airport/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 20:13:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/united-service-organizations-opens-new-center-at-slc-airport/ SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – United Service Organizations (USO) is opening a new airport hub, which will provide support to service members and families serving, training and traveling in Utah for the first time since World War II. According to a press release, the USO will provide support to the 32,840 active-duty and reserve members […]]]>

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4) – United Service Organizations (USO) is opening a new airport hub, which will provide support to service members and families serving, training and traveling in Utah for the first time since World War II.

According to a press release, the USO will provide support to the 32,840 active-duty and reserve members of the armed forces stationed over 84,899 square miles, including many underserved locations in and around the state.

“The USO goes where our troops go and we are proud to support our service members and their families who serve, train and travel in Utah,” said USO West President Bob Kurkjian. “We are extremely grateful for our partnership with Salt Lake City International Airport, as well as with our partners Northrop Grumman, Delta Airlines, Adobe, and the Utah Department of Veterans Affairs and Military Affairs, for assisting the ‘USO to keep our troops connected to family, home and country with this new airport hub.

The organization plans to do a grand opening on Feb. 4, which will showcase a 933-square-foot facility that can provide equipment and outreach programs to current members, as well as their families, of the military.

Amenities will include furniture for resting, computers and Wi-Fi, free snacks and drinks, luggage storage and a seating area with TV, movies and games.

Bill Wyatt, Executive Director of the Salt Lake City Airports Department, said, “We hope military personnel who connect through SLC find rest and relaxation here and that it makes their travels more enjoyable.

The USO has appointed Nate Vanenberg, a US Navy and Utah Air National Guard veteran, as USO Utah’s director of operations and programs to oversee the new center.

In addition to amenities, the new center will provide support operations and program delivery to the state’s five military bases, including “USO bridging programs, family days, emotional wellness programs, camps. for kids, sports entertainment, game nights, vacation programs, the Bob Hope Legacy program and more.

The USO has served the military for over 80 years, and they are currently looking for volunteers to join their team of more than 30,000 people who are supported.

To donate, volunteer, or explore sponsorship opportunities with USO Utah, please visit utah.uso.org.


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Broadband and property rights top Farm Bureau priorities in 2022 legislative session https://www.smlxtralarge.com/broadband-and-property-rights-top-farm-bureau-priorities-in-2022-legislative-session/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 23:11:48 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/broadband-and-property-rights-top-farm-bureau-priorities-in-2022-legislative-session/ Another session of the Missouri General Assembly is upon us, and this year promises to be a busy one. With the redistribution, members running for higher office, and many passionate legislative disagreements, 2022 is not likely to be short of fireworks at the State Capitol. The Missouri Farm Bureau’s priorities for this year’s session appeal […]]]>

Another session of the Missouri General Assembly is upon us, and this year promises to be a busy one. With the redistribution, members running for higher office, and many passionate legislative disagreements, 2022 is not likely to be short of fireworks at the State Capitol.

The Missouri Farm Bureau’s priorities for this year’s session appeal to the roots of who we are as an organization. As the largest agricultural organization in the state and the oldest agricultural office in the state, we believe in supporting farmers and rural communities and giving them the tools they need to be successful.

Missouri Farm Bureau President Garrett Hawkins
Missouri Farm Bureau President Garrett Hawkins

Our rural communities urgently need investment in infrastructure. One of the most pressing needs is for broadband service that will support businesses and improve the overall quality of life in rural Missouri. Gov. Mike Parson’s plan to invest $ 400 million in federal funds to roll out broadband is a wise use of this one-time infusion. This is a unique opportunity to energize our rural economies, improve access to breakthrough telemedicine capabilities, and bring the next generation home to the farm.

The defense of property rights is perhaps the most fundamental issue championed by Farm Bureau. Without strong property rights, the ability of farmers and ranchers to produce the food, fuel and fiber the world needs could be threatened. Amid historic supply chain disruptions, we need to make sure that we can continue to produce these products locally. In 2022, we will continue to work with lawmakers to end the misuse of the eminent domain. This power should be a last resort. We must limit its use to projects that genuinely benefit the general public. Simply put, a prominent domain should not be used for private gain.

The Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA) is a constant partner with farmers and ranchers in our state. For years, MDA’s Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority (MASBDA) has stimulated major growth centers for agriculture through the use of targeted tax credit programs. Credit for ethanol, biodiesel, fuelwood, and livestock processing capacity are essential to our state. These programs have been proven to yield many times their cost. In 2021, a routine sunset extension of programs did not reach the governor’s office. We expect a broad, bipartisan coalition to adopt a renewal of these agendas early in the 2022 session.

We also need to strengthen the abuses of the initiative petition process. Our current system has made it too easy for influencers out of state to buy their place on a ballot. Too often, these special interests cleverly mask radical proposals with deceptive language. We should only change the Missouri constitution when our citizens broadly agree that it is necessary. We will support efforts to protect our constitution from deceptive outside influences.

The next five months will surely bring a lot more controversy, and we will work to make our members’ voices heard in the State Capitol. No matter what comes up, we have to keep an eye on the goal. The Missouri Farm Bureau will work for the good of the people of Missouri and will do everything possible to secure meaningful legislation on the governor’s office.


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